ANIMATED NOTATION. 

selected. works

“Right is Wrong” is a solo piano piece, written with animated notation. Every time the piece is performed, the left hand is the same but the right hand is written with real-time notation and is continually changing. So the pianist can practice the left hand but not the right hand. The piece is supposed to challenge the idea of the perfect concert pianist that does not make mistakes. The goal is not perfection because the right hand is unpredictable
and impossibly hard to play. The right hand is wrong or Right is Wrong.

Premiered in May 2013 at The North Pole Theatre, Reykjavik. Performed in August 2013 at The Reykjavik Culture Night, in January 2014 at The Dark Music Days 2014 and in August 2006 at the Sonic Festival Denmark August.

 

View Score

Right is Wrong.

May. 2013

Y.

June. 2014

Y is an interactive chamber music piece written for four strings, three violins, and a cello, and includes motion detectors that generate a real-time animated score. Each time the piece is performed, it differs depending on the movement of the audience. The audience knows that they can interfere with the notation by moving, but they do not know how these movements are changing the notation. 

 

The score is built on traditional notation so it generates pitch on traditional five stave lines. Sometimes a rhythmic pattern is given, but sometimes only a pitch. If no rhythmic pattern is given the performer is free to improvise a free rhythm. Instead of using traditional musical terms, like allegro, it uses English adjectives, for example; shy, hysterical or impulsive. In the end, all pitches disappear and the four string players are given instruction to glissando. 

 

The notation generates complicated harmony and difficult rhythmic counterpoint. The visible aspect of the notation is an important part of this composition as well as giving the audience part in co-composing this composition with their movements.

 

The purpose of this piece was to explore audience participation randomising aspects of the notation.

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